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Syllabus for

PSY 401--Experimental Psychology

3 Credit hours

Spring 2010

 

 

I.          COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

A survey of the fundamentals of psychological research, experimentation, data analysis, and report writing.

Prerequisites: PSY 201and MAT 232

Corequisite: PSY 401 lab

 

This course will explore the fundamentals of psychological research: the logic of experimentation and the empirical approach, experimental design, and data analysis, with application of these to laboratory and non-laboratory settings.  Topics include sampling techniques one-way ANOVAs, factorial ANOVAs, and research ethics.

 

II.         COURSE GOALS

 

A.                 Familiarize the student with the strategies and tactical issues of experimental psychological research.

 

B.                 Cultivate a proper concern for accuracy and precision in laboratory work, ethics, and reporting.

 

C.                 Be equipped with the basic tools of experimental design and statistical analysis as related to psychology

 

D.                 Become familiarized with the laboratory and prepared insofar as possible for the Senior Paper experience.

 

E.                  Become proficient in analyzing statistical data utilizing SPSS.

 

F.                  Familiarize the student with appropriate APA reporting style and procedure.

 

III.               STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR THIS COURSE

 

            As a result of successfully completing this course, the student will be able to do the following:

 

A.     Criticize research using experimental designs.

 

B.      Use current literature on a selected topic to inform the student on the next appropriate step in the research process.

 

C.      Formulate appropriate hypotheses.

 

D.     Explain how to design an experimental study in terms of data collection and analysis.

 

E.      Describe the basic steps in t-tests, one-way and multi-way ANOVAs, and Factorial ANOVAs.

 

F.      Demonstrate correct data analysis using SPSS for the above procedures.

 

G.     Draw reasonable conclusions from the data analysis.

 

H.     List and discuss appropriate ethical principles when designing and analyzing experimental research.

 

I.       Report findings of an experimental study in acceptable APA format.

 

IV.              TEXTBOOKS AND OTHER LEARNING RESOURCES

 

Required Materials

Textbooks

 

Smith, R. A., and Davis, S. F. (2003). The Psychologist as detective. (3rd ed.) Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

           

American Psychological Association (2001)  Publication manual of the American psychological association. (5th ed.).  Washington, D.C.: author.

 

Recommended Materials

Textbooks:

 

   Gravetter, F & Wallnau, L. (2007)  Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. (7th Ed.), Belmont, CA: Thompson.

 

V.     POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

A.                 University Policies and Procedures

1.            Attendance at each class or laboratory is mandatory at Oral Roberts University. Excessive absences can reduce a student’s grade or deny credit for the course.

2.            Students taking a late exam because of an unauthorized absence are charged a late exam fee.

3.            Students and faculty at Oral Roberts University must adhere to all laws addressing the ethical use of others’ materials, whether it is in the form of print, video, multimedia, or computer software.  By submitting an assignment in any form, the student gives permission for the assignment to be checked for plagiarism, either by submitting the work for electronic verification or by other means.

4.            Final exams cannot be given before their scheduled times.  Students need to check the final exam schedule before planning return flights or other events at the end of the semester.

5.            Students are to be in compliance with University, school, and departmental policies regarding ePortfolio requirements.  Students should consult the ePortfolio handbooks for requirements regarding general education and the students’ majors.

a.      The penalty for not submitting electronically or for incorrectly submitting an ePortfolio artifact is a zero for that assignment.

b.      By submitting an assignment, the student gives permission for the assignment to be assessed electronically.

 

B.                 Department Policies and Procedures

 

            Policies and procedures for submitting artifacts can be found in the General Education ePortfolio Handbook and the departmental handbook for the student’s major.

 

C.         Course Policies and Procedures

1.           Evaluation Procedures

a.             Examinations—Three unit exams (100 points each) for a total of 300 points.

b.            Participation Grade (100 points total) Several class activities, lab work, and/or SPSS assignments will be given throughout the semester. These may be unannounced, so regular attendance is paramount.

c.             Senior Paper Proposal - (100 points). See assignment requirements provided by the professor.

 

2.            ePortfolio Requirements

a.      The research proposal for senior paper as detailed above will be submitted to the student’s ePortfolio account by the 10th week of the semester.

b.      Artifacts not submitted electronically or incorrectly submitted receive a zero for that assignment.

 

3.        Other Policies and/or Procedures

a.             Contemporaneity--All material presented in fulfillment of course requirements must be initiated and completed during the semester the course is offered.  Papers prepared in other semesters and for other courses are not accepted for this course.

b.            Exclusiveness--All course requirements are designed for this course alone and are to be submitted only for this course.  Likewise, assignments carried out for other courses during this semester are not accepted for this course.

c.             Under no circumstances is any material, score sheets, or test interpretations to be used by the student for any purpose other than for educational experiences involved in this course.  There are severe penalties for misuse of materials.

d.            Punctuality--Deadlines for submitted course assignments are printed in this syllabus in order that the students may budget time and submit each assignment on or before the deadline. The instructor reserves the right to refuse to accept material submitted late.

e.             Changes--Class attendance is considered an essential component of the requirements of this course.  Therefore, any changes in syllabi, assignments, exams, or class requirements announced in class by the instructor are considered to constitute adequate and sufficient notice.  It is each student’s responsibility to be aware of any such changes and to contact the instructor if unsure of what is expected.

f.             Assignments and Papers

(1)               All assignments and papers are due at the beginning of class the day the assignment and/or papers are due.

(2)               Unless specified by the instructor, all assignments and papers must be typed. 

(3)               Spelling, grammar, and neatness count towards the final grade.

(4)               The official guide for all papers in the Department of Behavioral Sciences is the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th ed. 2001.

(5)               Late assignments and papers receive point deductions. Because course requirements are assigned in advance, excused extensions are extremely rare.

(6)               Plagiarized work receives no points for the assignment/paper and no makeup opportunities.  To avoid having work suspected of plagiarism, make sure the sources of information and opinion are documented and acknowledged.

g.             Excused Makeup Exams

(1)               No points or fees are deducted for Administrative Excuses.  These must be typed, signed by the appropriate staff in Dr. Fagin's office, and presented to the instructor no later than one day before which the exam is to be given. If an emergency arises, preventing taking the exam at the scheduled time, notify the professor before the exam is given.

(2)               Because exams are announced in advance, excused makeup exams are extremely rare.

(3)               As physician appointments can be scheduled around exams, only bona fide emergency visits, properly documented (signed excuse), are acceptable.  No points or fees are deducted for an excused emergency.  The form used by the school nurse is not acceptable.

(4)               Arrangements must be made to take the excused makeup exam within one week of the originally scheduled exam.  Requests to arrange to take an excused makeup exam must be submitted in typed form, dated and given to the instructor no later than one week before the scheduled exam.

h.            Late Exams

(1)               No show--no points.

(2)               The student must notify the instructor no later than within the week before the exam is to be given. Failure to do so constitutes a "no show."

(3)               The student must pay the late fee of $10 before the exam is given.  No exam is given without proof of fee payment.

(4)               Arrangements must be made to take the makeup exam within one week of the originally scheduled exam.  Requests to arrange to take a late exam must be submitted in typed form and dated.

(5)               The student automatically loses 10% of the total possible points as a late exam penalty.

i.              Cheating

(1)               Blatant—the student receives no points for the exam and no makeup.

(2)               Suspected (i.e., reported by classmate or proctor)—the student takes a makeup exam.  The procedure for the makeup exam follows that of a late exam (as above).  If refused, the student receives no points for the exam.

(3)               All appeals to the contrary must be typed and copies given to both Dr. Feller and the instructor within the week.

j.              Office Hours

(1)               Office hours are posted on instructor's door and given in class.

(2)               If students cannot make the posted hours they should see instructor after class or leave a message (with a phone number and/or box number and times available).

(3)               If the instructor's door is closed students should check first with the secretary before knocking.  The student should respect the confidentiality of others that is requested by the closed door.

k.      Attendance is mandatory in all classes.  Habitually arriving late to a class is a sign of disrespect to the instructor and class members alike and should be avoided.  If scheduling makes it impossible for the student to arrive on time on a regular basis, that student should inform the instructor. 

 

VI.    COURSE CALENDAR

 

Week

Chapter

Notes

1

Syllabus

Orientation

2

Ch. 1

Science of Psychology

 

Ch. 2

Ideas, Critiquing, and Hypotheses

3

Ch. 2

Ideas, Critiquing, and Hypotheses

 

Ch. 3

Ethical Concerns

4

Ch. 3

Ethical Concerns

 

Ch. 6

Experimental Methods I

5

Ch. 6

Experimental Methods I

 

Ch. 7

Experimental Methods II

6

Ch. 7

Experimental Methods II

 

Ch. 8

Internal & External Validity

7

Ch. 1-3, 6-8

Exam I

 

Ch. 9

Basic Statistics

8

Ch. 9

Basic Statistics

 

Ch. 10

Two-Group Experiments

9

Ch. 10

Two-Group Experiments

 

Ch. 10

Two-Group Experiments

10

Ch. 11

Multiple-Group Experiments

 

Ch. 11

Multiple-Group Experiments

 

 

Spring Break

 

 

Spring Break

11

Ch. 11

Multiple-Group Experiments

 

Chs. 9-11

Exam II

12

Ch. 12

Multiple-IV Experiments

 

Ch. 12

Multiple-IV Experiments

13

Ch. 13

Alternative Designs

 

Ch. 13

Alternative Designs

14

Ch. 13

APA-Format Research Reports (Proposals due!!)

 

Ch. 13

APA-Format Research Reports

15

Chs. 1-14

synthesis

 

Chs. 12-14

Final Exam Review

         16

        

Final Exam

Chapters 12 - 14


* Exam and topic dates may vary according to the needs of each individual class.  Deviations from this schedule will be discussed in the regular class meetings.

 

Course Inventory for ORU’s Student Learning Outcomes

 

Psy 401: Experimental Psychology

Spring 2010

 

This course contributes to the ORU student learning outcomes as indicated below:

Significant Contribution – Addresses the outcome directly and includes targeted assessment.

Moderate Contribution – Addresses the outcome directly or indirectly and includes some assessment.

Minimal Contribution – Addresses the outcome indirectly and includes little or no assessment.

No Contribution – Does not address the outcome.

 

The Student Learning Glossary at http://ir.oru.edu/doc/glossary.pdf  defines each outcome and each of the proficiencies/capacities.

 

 

OUTCOMES & Proficiencies/Capacities

Significant Contribution

Moderate Contribution

Minimal

Contribution

No

Contribution

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Outcome #1 – Spiritually Alive

Proficiencies/Capacities

 

 

 

 

1A

Biblical knowledge

 

 

 

x

1B

Sensitivity to the Holy Spirit

 

 

 

x

1C

Evangelistic capability

 

 

 

x

1D

Ethical behavior

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Outcome #2 – Intellectually Alert

Proficiencies/Capacities

 

 

 

 

2A

Critical thinking

x

 

 

 

2B

Information literacy

x

 

 

 

2C

Global & historical perspectives

 

 

 

x

2D

Aesthetic appreciation

 

 

 

x

2E

Intellectual creativity

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

Outcome #3 – Physically Disciplined

Proficiencies/Capacities

 

 

 

 

3A

Healthy lifestyle

 

 

 

x

3B

Physically disciplined lifestyle

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

Outcome #4 – Socially Adept

Proficiencies/Capacities

 

 

 

 

4A

Communication skills

x

 

 

 

4B

Interpersonal skills

 

 

x

 

4C

Appreciation of cultural & linguistic differences

 

 

x

 

4D

Responsible citizenship

 

x

 

 

4E

Leadership capacity

 

x

 

 

 (Revised 1/15/04)